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MACN Expands Fight Against Corruption With Local Partnerships

MACN
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Published Dec 17, 2021 3:03 PM by The Maritime Executive

The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network, an industry partnership that combats port-side bribery and extortion, is expanding its operations in Egypt with the addition of a new local partner. Eldib Pandi, a longtime local correspondent for P&I clubs and provider of legal services to shipping, will now also serve as the local contact point for MACN's members. 

MACN has adopted a similar operating model in Nigeria, Argentina, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Ukraine, with local partners providing local advice to shipping on how to deal with official corruption. 

“Regardless of location, we have seen the value of having a local partner that understands the unique issues facing ships and crew in each port. On-the-ground support is a critical part of empowering masters and crew to reject corrupt demands," said MACN's CEO, Cecilia Müller Torbrand.

In Egypt, Eldib Pandi will serve as the local contact for MACN members when they run into trouble with corruption at Egyptian ports, terminals, and seaways. In addition, the firm will support MACN's outreach effort, making contact with Egyptian stakeholders to explain the consequences of corruption for local businesses. 

"Corruption free shipping means greater economic growth and better trade conditions for our local communities. Things everyone should be in favor of," said Eldib Pandi in a statement. 

Corrupt port state officials have solicited bribes and facilitation payments for as long as ships have sailed, and their requests are often accompanied by the threat of steep fines for minor or imaginary deficiencies. MACN works to bring together shipping companies to fight corruption collectively. Its members represent about 50 percent of global tonnage, and it has collected more than 40,000 reports of corrupt activity to date. The organization says that it has had notable success in addressing corruption in the Suez Canal and certain ports in Indonesia, Nigeria and Argentina, among other localities.